Quarantine Tips: Making The Most of Space

Hello again!

I hope you found the last post helpful. I feel as though the next natural step for our exploration into making quarantine an easier situation for us to find ourselves in, is to make use of our space.

With this segment, I want to focus on how we can maintain our mental health. Everyone is saying how quarantine can be so difficult, and it is, but I want to give you concrete examples and help every week in order to help you during this tough period. Even if this means you read this for 2-3 minutes and it makes you smile, or you take one small thing away from it.

Now that we have a cosy environment, in our personal rooms, we can think of ways we would like to use our other rooms.

Katie has to work from home so she has made her room, into both a bedroom and an office. We did not have a desk for her to use, so we had to get creative: we used a table that our uncle had in the living room as a desk, and a chair from his office to use in her room, that he wasn’t using.

One very simple thing we did was we used a rug which was already in her room, to put the table and chair on top of. This is an easy way to separate off Katie’s ‘work space’ from her ‘comfort space’. It is not intrusive at all, and adds a nice touch to her room!

I am aware that Katie and I are in unique situations where we had completely new rooms to mess around with and see what works where. I implore you to also shuffle things around if you have time and energy!

For example, a simple way to open up new space is to push you bed against a wall corner, which Katie and I have both done.

In my room, I did a similar method to open up new space. The cube furniture at the end of my bed made a small amount of space which originally had a shoe rack in. Upon return from my second trip to university to retrieve the rest of my stuff, I found myself with more clothes. One way I made use of space was to fold my clothes away in this method:

Its a bit messy, and you can certainly find better examples online, but this is a realistic organisation of my t-shirts

I do not have a wardrobe and instead have a clothes rack. By limiting the amount of clothes I needed to put onto the rack, the rack immediately looks cleaner, clearer and less cluttered.

One other simple thing I did was shrink the rack from a high bar to a bar that fits in line with the top of the cube; this was a simple way for the rack to be more ‘hidden’ so that my room would not appear cluttered or overfilled.

Another more final method is a typical university student stereotype: the clothes door rack filled with jackets.

I usually always have my door open, so this monstrosity remains hidden from view, and doesn’t compromise with space.

I think this is a crucial thing to do during quarantine if you are thinking of decluttering, because otherwise smaller rooms can feel claustrophobic.

Maybe these simple, easy tricks will help some people declutter/be more space effective. If not please feel free to add more ideas in the comment section!

I hope everyone is staying sane, safe and well.

Evee x

15 thoughts on “Quarantine Tips: Making The Most of Space

  1. I once put my bed head first in the closet. Lol It gave my room so much more space. Of course, this only works if you have enough closet space elsewhere and can live without your closet. 😆 Nice post! Fatigue keeps me a little less physically creative these days, but reading your post was like memory lane. I used to shuffle things around a lot more. You stay safe, sane and well as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I must look at my room again. It’s become a dumping ground for the rest of the house. In a few minutes I am off to fold my clothes again. Not enough room so many sit on top of the wardrobe which looks a mess. At least my desktop is almost tidy. Except for three In the Night Garden toys. Must have them. Keep smiling x

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi there. I am going around the neighborhood introducing myself. My name is Marc. My blog contains excerpts from my book The Driveway Rules. It contains memoirs about growing up with undiagnosed autism. I hope you stop by.

    Liked by 1 person

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